Steve LeVine: CEO of Steve LeVine Entertainment

Steve Levine, CEO of Steve LeVine Entertainment, photographed at his office in Scottsdale by Nicki Escudero

Steve Levine, CEO of Steve LeVine Entertainment, photographed at his office in Scottsdale by Nicki Escudero

Steve LeVine
twitter.com/SteveLeVineEnt

If you’ve been to a Valley nightclub in the past six years, you’ve probably seen some of Steve LeVine’s work. The 39-year-old Scottsdale resident and Los Angeles native is the self-titled “Chief Entertainment Officer” of Steve LeVine Entertainment, which organizes some of the Valley’s biggest nightlife shindigs, as well as concerts and sports-related events. He’s been working in the entertainment industry since he was only 14 years old, when he started as a DJ for his friends’ parties before moving into Greek life parties and starting his own DJ company. Now, Steve LeVine Entertainment, launched in 2007, employees 35 full-time staff members and more than 70 independent contractors, organizing parties around the Southwest.

LeVine is also an investor in Maya Day & NightClub, which hosts Audien for tomorrow, December 31’s New Year’s Eve party. He’s also an investor in restaurant Majerle’s. Keep reading for how he started his business, which also signed singers Kelley James and Scott Keo and does public relations for clients such as fitness studio Amenzone. Plus, scroll down to hear five reasons why he loves living in the Valley.

What brought you to Arizona?

I liked baseball and used to come to Arizona with my family all the time for spring training. I came to visit Arizona State (University) and fell in love with the place. I originally wanted to go to school to be an architect, and ASU’s school of architecture was top-rated and pretty amazing.

I ended up choosing a whole different path. I got into mass communications quickly and was in the very first class to get a Bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary studies. Continue reading

Anamieke Quinn: Owner of Sidepony Music and Treasurefruit Singer

Anamieke Quinn, owner of Sidepony Music and director of artist and media relations at Fervor Records, photographed at her home in Scottsdale, by Nicki Escudero

Anamieke Quinn, owner of Sidepony Music and singer for Treasurefruit, photographed at her home in Scottsdale, by Nicki Escudero

Anamieke Quinn
twitter.com/SideponyMusic

Anamieke Quinn is a Valley renaissance woman when it comes to the music world. By day, the 32-year-old Scottsdale resident represents a wide variety of music and artists on local record label Fervor Records, and at night, she morphs into musician mode. She plays in not one, not two, but three bands — she plays upright bass for the Sara McAllister Band, plays electric bass and does backup vocals for Ruca and is the frontwoman for Treasurefruit, which plays all her original soulful music. And when she finally gets a breather, she supports other local acts and organizes music festivals, such as her recent Sidepony Express Music Festival in Bisbee. And, oh, yeah — she founded Sidepony Music, her own artist management company that represents Valley acts such as Doctor Bones. Learn more about her here, and read on for why she considers Arizona her frontier and to hear five reasons why she loves living in the Valley.

What brought you to Arizona?

I was born in Thousand Oaks, California but grew up in the Arcadia area and went back to California for college at University of Southern California to study music industry. I was realizing that in order to pursue my goals as far as starting my own record label and building up myself as an artist while helping other people artistically, it was foolish to stay in a place with such high overhead as Los Angeles. If I wanted to spend all my money sending CD’s to radio stations and with postage and packaging, I didn’t really have the luxury of staying in an expensive place to live like Los Angeles was, so I decided it was more important to me to get stuff done than live in an awesome place and hope I’d meet the right person to advance my career. I moved back (to Phoenix) a little after college. Continue reading