Ron Hoon: FOX 10 Morning Show Anchor, Community Activist

Ron Hoon, anchor for the Phoenix FOX 10 Morning Show, photographed at the FOX 10 Studios in Phoenix, by Nicki Escudero

Ron Hoon, anchor for the FOX 10 Morning Show, photographed at the FOX 10 Studios in Phoenix, by Nicki Escudero

Ron Hoon
twitter.com/RonHoonFox10

Ron Hoon is one of the most prominent Valley media figures, having been on local airwaves on FOX 10 for the past 31 years. The 56-year-old Mesa resident is currently the morning show anchor, where you can watch him Monday through Friday from 4:30-10 a.m., telling Valley viewers about national and local news trends while interviewing world and local stand-outs — all while keeping his cool under the lights during the live show. Read on for where his passion comes from, and keep scrolling for a video of five of his favorite things about living in the Valley.

What brought you to Arizona?

When I was in about 6th grade living in Wenatchee, Washington, the apple capital of the work, my very first job was picking apples. I was listening to a broadcast of the Seattle Supersonics one cold, miserable day up there, and the announcer was talking about what a beautiful day it was in Phoenix, since the Supersonics were playing the (Phoenix) Suns. He was talking about being in shirtsleeves all day and how they went out golfing and how it was so beautiful. That planted the seed.

I was born in Washington, went to high school there, and then went to University of Washington to study broadcasting, journalism and business. I got a job at the ABC station in Spokane anchoring the news, and after a couple years, I decided to see what was out there. My wife and I loaded up our little Toyota station wagon with a bunch of videotapes and no air conditioner and drove around the West. We drove to Denver, L.A. and Phoenix, and we really had a connection with this city and this station. I was about 25 years old when I moved here.

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Stephen Jones: Executive Chef at Blue Hound Kitchen & Cocktails

Stephen Jones
twitter.com/ChefStephenJ

Have a drink or meal at Blue Hound Kitchen & Cocktails at CityScape in downtown Phoenix, and you’re going to leave supremely satisfied. That’s because executive chef Stephen Jones, a 33-year-old Phoenix resident who also helped give the bar and restaurant its cozy feel, whips up an amazing selection of Southern-inspired dishes made with local ingredients that are meant to be shared. Jones helped open the Hotel Palomar restaurant a little more than ago, and it has quickly become one of CityScape’s hottest destinations for both travelers and locals. The former college football player came to Phoenix from Chicago, and he hopes to bring that big-city vibe to the Valley’s dining scene, as well, with plans to open a new restaurant within two years. Get to know Jones better here, and keep reading to hear five of his favorite parts about Valley life.

What brought you to Arizona?

I moved here for my fiancee. I had never been here. I was born in New Jersey, raised in California, and moved to Chicago. I’m kind of a weird transplant. Continue reading

Matty Steinkamp: Last Exit Live Marketing Director, Sundawg Media Owner

Matty Steinkamp, Last Exit Live Marketing Director and Sundawg Media Owner, photographed at Last Exit Live in Phoenix, by Nicki Escudero

Matty Steinkamp, Last Exit Live Marketing Director and Sundawg Media Owner, photographed at Last Exit Live in Phoenix, by Nicki Escudero

Matty Steinkamp
twitter.com/SundawgMedia

Matty Steinkamp has been one of the Valley’s driving forces behind uniting its music scene for almost the past decade. The 33-year-old Phoenix resident founded Sundawg Records, which represented bands including What Laura Says, The Wiley One and A Life of Science, a label that was active from 2005-2012. Now, he still helps market bands through his Sundawg Media, whose services include everything from creative concepts to music video direction, and is the marketing director of live music venue Last Exit Live, which opened this past April in central Phoenix. Steinkamp is known for his enthusiasm and love for music, and he’s a trained musician himself, in voice and piano, having performed acoustically and in bands and in a barbershop quartet, having sung everywhere from Japan to California. Steinkamp┬ápromises a great mix of local and national music will hit the Last Exit Live stage, and he talked about his view of the local scene, as well as five reasons why he loves living in the Valley, below.

What brought you to Arizona?

I was born and raised here. My grandparents moved out here in the early 1900’s, and my parents and whole family grew up here. I was born in Phoenix, went to North Canyon High School and Paradise Valley Community College and to ministry school before going to Northern Arizona University. Continue reading

Timothy Verville: Arizona Pro Arte Conductor, North Valley Chamber Orchestra Music Director

Timothy Verville, Arizona Pro Arte conductor, North Valley Chamber Orchestra music director and conductor, and Boston Chamber Orchestra co-conductor, photographed at Casey Moore's in Tempe, by Nicki Escudero

Timothy Verville, Arizona Pro Arte conductor and Boston Chamber Orchestra co-conductor, photographed at Casey Moore’s in Tempe, by Nicki Escudero

Timothy Verville
twitter.com/TimothyVerville

You might not be used to seeing 33-year-old conductors take control of symphonies, but Timothy Verville is one young local musician taking charge of Valley orchestras. As conductor for Arizona Pro Arte, associate conductor for Boston Chamber Orchestra and music director and conductor of the North Valley Chamber Orchestra, Verville guides symphony members to perform better together than they ever could on their own. There is no need to dress up in fancy duds to watch Verville in action — Arizona Pro Arte, which he helped co-found, is an innovative musical collaboration that pairs an orchestra (with about 50 members) with live art, ranging from silent films to visual slideshows. Check the group out Saturday, June 15 at Tempe Center for the Arts, and keep reading to hear why Verville wanted to be a conductor — as well as five reasons why he loves living in the Valley.

What brought you to Arizona?

I had just finished my Master’s Degree in orchestral conducting at the Boston Conservatory, and ASU had offered me the chance to come here to get a doctoral degree. I came here 4 years ago but am originally from Oklahoma. Continue reading